Kazuya Sakai

At the Dallas Museum of Art, visitors with red-green deficiencies can now check out a pair of color blindness alleviation lenses at no cost.

Kazuya is one of the artists included (posthumously). Born in Buenos Aires to Japanese parents, he spent the majority of his youth in Japan, studying literature and philosophy. Upon his return to Argentina in 1951, Sakai, a self-taught painter, dedicated himself to the visual arts. He saw in his artwork—as in himself—a unification of Eastern and Western elements. His first works were geometric in style, reflecting the pivotal influence of Argentina’s Concrete Art Movement.

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Claude Viallat

Jonathan Stephenson at Two Coats notes that Claude’s latest work, in a quietly radiant show at Ceysson & Bénétière on the Upper East Side, which is full of colorful patterns resembling camouflage on fragments of military tarpaulins, suggests that while society might try to hide war in plain sight, it cycles through civic life and demands attention on a generational basis.

#claudeviallat