Antonietta Grassi

Overlaying candy-colored, geometric prisms with glimmering networks of lines that weave through and around them, painter Antonietta Grassi could easily be taken for the love child of Josef and Anni Albers. Yet while underscoring the contiguity of modernist composition and traditional craft, her exquisite abstractions also demonstrate the visual similarities between loom work and computer code.

#antoniettagrassi

Lydia Okumura

Lydia has been a fav for a while. I’ve thought of her as related to Light and Space with work like below, and much of her work is also minimalist as Sophie Haigney at Artsy notes when calling our attention to the rich history of women artists whose work is of this modality.

#lydiaokumura

Louise Fishman

Artforum notes “Ballin’ the Jack,” and also that Louise began “her practice at the height of Abstract Expressionism; Fishman asserted herself as a queer feminist Jewish woman within the artistic milieu of the time. Her atmospheric spaces and muscular articulations recount the urgency of her self-expression, and speak to the dynamic forward motion of ballin’ the jack, or going full-speed.”

#louisefishman

Tamina Amadyar

Alongside large-format canvases—abstractions, never in more than two shades—Tamina Amadyar is showing watercolors for the first time. Figurative, multicolored, and intimate in scale, this new group of works, begun this spring, stands in clear contrast to Amadyar’s iconic pigment and gluten paintings.

(Always) glad to see artists challenging the notion that one most be only a figurative or abstract painter.

#taminaamadyr

Annie May Young

Posting about Rosie recently made me realize that I should look into the quilting “movement” from Gee’s Bend. This article has some more context on the medium’s recent impacts.

More

#anniemayyoung

(also, and, for those interested in movements in material art here’s the post I did on the women of Bauhaus)