Alonzo Davis

Davis’ six-decade-long career (which Parrasch Heijnen is pleased to highlight in the gallery’s first solo exhibition covering the same) has explored a wide range of media and methods, from mural to print, painting, sculpture, performance, and installation. As co-founder of the Brockman Gallery, the first major Black-owned contemporary art gallery in Los Angeles (1967 – 1990), Alonzo Davis sought to champion Black artists including David Hammons, Suzanne Jackson, Betye Saar, Senga Nengudi, Noah Purifoy, and John Outterbridge, among many others, in a time when white, male art was prevalent. Davis’ appreciation and promotion of Black artists and cultural references collected on trips all over the world are often referenced in his own work.

#alonzodavis

Tadaaki Kuwayama

In the first of three innovative
exhibitions featuring pairs of artists whose work is sometimes overtly,
sometimes inadvertently linked through the intimacies of living together, Shoshana Wayne Gallery highlights the paper constructions of Rakuko Naito and the paintings of Tadaaki Kuwayama
.

#tadaakikuwayama

The shape I’m in

So first things first- go see the 68th annual Durham Art Guild juried show. I’m really happy with this piece (wish I had taken a pic that shows some other object for scale reference- this one is roughly 5′ from top to bottom).

I’ve also been continuing to explore the shape of the container for these containers- in a couple of cases, the shape of the canvas. Previous iterations are below, all of which I’ve written more about (here, here and here).

Below are some images of the work in progress. Relying a lot on the projector for this one. I am enjoying the way my process for generating paintings has distinct elements of fabrication, like taping off lines, that allow me to just be in the studio and execute.

Kazuya Sakai

At the Dallas Museum of Art, visitors with red-green deficiencies can now check out a pair of color blindness alleviation lenses at no cost.

Kazuya is one of the artists included (posthumously). Born in Buenos Aires to Japanese parents, he spent the majority of his youth in Japan, studying literature and philosophy. Upon his return to Argentina in 1951, Sakai, a self-taught painter, dedicated himself to the visual arts. He saw in his artwork—as in himself—a unification of Eastern and Western elements. His first works were geometric in style, reflecting the pivotal influence of Argentina’s Concrete Art Movement.

#kazuyasakai