Alonzo Davis

Davis’ six-decade-long career (which Parrasch Heijnen is pleased to highlight in the gallery’s first solo exhibition covering the same) has explored a wide range of media and methods, from mural to print, painting, sculpture, performance, and installation. As co-founder of the Brockman Gallery, the first major Black-owned contemporary art gallery in Los Angeles (1967 – 1990), Alonzo Davis sought to champion Black artists including David Hammons, Suzanne Jackson, Betye Saar, Senga Nengudi, Noah Purifoy, and John Outterbridge, among many others, in a time when white, male art was prevalent. Davis’ appreciation and promotion of Black artists and cultural references collected on trips all over the world are often referenced in his own work.

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Beverly Buchanan

Dead Lecturer / distant relative: Notes from the Woodshed, 1950-1980 focuses on works by Asian American and African American artists whose approaches to abstraction provided alternatives to prevailing vocabularies for representation and resistance during the social movements of the 1960s and 70s, and for whom the parameters of visibility continue to remain a problem for thought today. Beverly is one of the selected creatives (also including Howardena and Al). Her work mined a strong motif for decades and slowly became more abstracted although never was true “abstraction.” Readers of who like below should also explore Jennifer and Nicky.

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Maki Ueda

catches the attention of Eva Díaz at the World Perfumery Congress (yes you read that right). Maki is an olfactory artist. As a creative that (tries to) focus on the viewer’s sense of sight, I am so here for her work- and she makes aromas whose application on a surface changes in black light (below)!

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Rochelle Feinstein

Artforum notes Whitney Claflin and Rochelle’s enduring engagement—personal and political, abstract and hyper-specific—with living in America. (Further) Feinstein stitched worming lines of hand-dyed, rainbow yarn into a group of drop cloth paintings that include American Sampler / 2020 (all works 2022), in which she uses the threads to trace the contours of a puzzle of light-washed red and blue state-like shapes. The stops and starts of colorful embroidery are garish and hopeful, like a last-ditch attempt to metaphorically heal the nation.
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Marta Minujin

The Institute for Studies on Latin American Art (ISLAA) is delighted to present Born of Informalismo: Marta Minujín and the Nascent Body of Performance, curated by Michaëla de Lacaze Mohrmann. The third in a series of exhibitions on Latin American modernism and its legacies, this show examines the early work of trailblazing Argentine artist Marta Minujín (b. 1943), tracing her trajectory from informalist painting and sculpture to performance.

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