Richard Smith

Richard Smith, CBE (27 October 1931 – 15 April 2016) was an English painter and printmaker. Smith produced work in a range of styles, and is credited with extending the field of painting through his shaped, sculptural canvases. A key figure in the British development of Pop Art, Smith was chosen to represent Britain in the 1970 Venice Biennale.

#richardsmith

Anahita Akhavan

Anahita is an Iranian-Canadian painter and visual art educator based in Toronto. She takes influence in her work from memories of Iran and the cultural signifiers of her homeland in relation to her new adopted home of Canada. She seeks to create a dialogue between immigration and identity that is inspired by the cultural richness and the deep spiritual belief behind Iranian art and architecture.

#anahitaakhavan

Jeanne Trippier

I’ve been reading Line Let Loose and Jeanne gets a mention. Daughter of a wine merchant, Tripier Jeanne spent her childhood with her grandmother in the countryside. As an adult, she lived in Montmartre with her son Gustav, whose father was American. Spiritualism entered her life when she was fifty-eight. It was during this period that she started to experience mental distress. Committed in 1934 for “chronic psychosis, logorrhea and megalomania,” Jeanne Tripier developed, during the ten years of her hospitalization, a vision of the world that she transcribed in her Messages relating her interplanetary travel, or Missions on Earth. “Medium of first necessity, holder of the laws of the planet, and the reincarnation of Joan of Arc,” she created drawings in ink, combined with hair dye, nail polish or pharmaceuticals but also embroideries, her needle constituting a formidable weapon. She uttered prophesies, triggered wars, sometimes using secret codes she called “the spherical language.”

#jeannetripier

Ruth Wolf-Rehfeldt

Curated by Kathleen Reinhardt and first shown at the Albertinum Museum in Dresden, For Ruth, The Sky in Los Angeles: Ruth Wolf-Rehfeldt and David Horvitz is a living homage to the history of Mail Art and visual poetry and a recognition of their ongoing resonance.

More

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Tadaaki Kuwayama

In the first of three innovative
exhibitions featuring pairs of artists whose work is sometimes overtly,
sometimes inadvertently linked through the intimacies of living together, Shoshana Wayne Gallery highlights the paper constructions of Rakuko Naito and the paintings of Tadaaki Kuwayama
.

#tadaakikuwayama

Kazuya Sakai

At the Dallas Museum of Art, visitors with red-green deficiencies can now check out a pair of color blindness alleviation lenses at no cost.

Kazuya is one of the artists included (posthumously). Born in Buenos Aires to Japanese parents, he spent the majority of his youth in Japan, studying literature and philosophy. Upon his return to Argentina in 1951, Sakai, a self-taught painter, dedicated himself to the visual arts. He saw in his artwork—as in himself—a unification of Eastern and Western elements. His first works were geometric in style, reflecting the pivotal influence of Argentina’s Concrete Art Movement.

#kazuyasakai

Claude Viallat

Jonathan Stephenson at Two Coats notes that Claude’s latest work, in a quietly radiant show at Ceysson & Bénétière on the Upper East Side, which is full of colorful patterns resembling camouflage on fragments of military tarpaulins, suggests that while society might try to hide war in plain sight, it cycles through civic life and demands attention on a generational basis.

#claudeviallat