Ibrahim Mahama

Artforum notes an online solo exhibition at White Cube of recent jute sack paintings by Ibrahim Mahama. “In these works, Mahama continues his interrogation of the principle that by engaging with the failures of the past it is possible to ignite new value systems for the future. By so doing, there is the potential to engender economic change that would lead to labor reforms. Produced in his native Ghana with the help of “collaborators,” the jute sacks from which the paintings are created point to histories of trade and commerce and the personal stories of their handlers…”

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Austyn Weiner

says about his newest which Artforum notes that “these paintings have been made through a pandemic, through a civil unrest in my country, and now through fires ablaze all around me. The title “Nobody’s Baby” eludes to a longing for guidance, and a need for stablity and intimacy…”

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Caroline Achaintre

In Caroline one-person exhibition at Fondazione Giuliani, watercolor, ceramic, bamboo, and wool are the protagonists of a narrative that seems to emerge from the viscera of creative expression. The French-born artist’s works take possession of the gallery space like three-dimensional biomorphic entities, even when simply hung on the walls like paintings.

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Otto Zitko

For an artist whose bright oil stick lines often explode, uncontained, across the walls and ceilings of galleries, it feels fitting for this moment—one of physical distance, meditation, and uncertainty—that the works in Otto Zitko’s exhibition “In Times Like These” are anxiously restrained to canvas size

More (older installation work like below)

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Nonggirrnga Marawili

taps the Earth for her materials and muses. Her works—prints, works on paper, paintings on bark, and larrakitj (memorial poles made from the bark of eucalyptus trees)—are often made with natural ochers that coalesce in spontaneous webs of lines and dots. The resulting works are ethereal, expressive interpretations of water.

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