James Siena

One of the blogs I have in my RSS feed is Two Coats of Paint. They used the image below as the headline for their January gallery review, and the show is at Pace, so I paid attention. I’ve heard of Siena before (he’s got twenty on me so he’s been at it for a minute) and decided to look deeper. (One of the) reasons to keep this blog is to remember to look what other folks are doing (and keep a record of things I like). I won’t lie- reviewing his catalogue gives me hope that some day mine might be worth some young abstract painter doing the same.

#jamessiena

Matthew Kubler

Ran across this artist because I follow the tag #hardedgepainting on Instagram*, and was not surprised to find we like a lot of the same color field painters. I encourage you to visit his website and peep some of the videos that shows the work over time. *He also has an Instagram feed.

#matthewkubler

Cole Pierce

I ran across Cole’s “199” recently on Tumblr, those of you from Raleigh (like me) may have seen his installation at the CAM in ’12. His recent work includes paintings, works on paper and public Art. I definitely find myself drawn to the planned randomness of these, as well as the early modernist pallet which doesn’t feel derivative so much as aware.

#colepierce

Warren Isensee

Isensee is an NC-born painter who has been making work since 80’s Neo-Geo almost ruined abstract painting, and to my eye is committed to formalism (his work is too insistent on being seen to be a sign for some conceptual agenda). Yet another artist I ran across while Tumblr’ing, he shows with Danese Corey. Looking forward to what’s coming based on the works on paper he’s been posting on his Instagram feed.

#warrenisensee

Marcia Hafif

Hyperallergic is another recent find for me- as is Marcia (apparently as you’ll read in this article, I’m not alone). I am not usually drawn to minimalism for its own sake, either visually over intellectually, but these caught my attention. It was interesting to find out after questioning the initial attraction that one of my biggest inspirations, Robert Irwin, was one of Hafif’s instructors at one point. I hope I get to run across these at some point. While I certainly enjoy a good bit of painting that considers itself conceptual, I tend to be drawn to work that is primarily concerned with formal investigation, which is of course a concept in itself. I think the key distinction is that the impetus of the type of work to which I’m referring points to itself in the end (as the writer puts it, “they offer complex visual, intellectual, and emotional experiences.”). I would encourage the reader to also Google for images of other paintings made by Hafif, she certainly explored several ways of creating these experiences.

#marciahafif